Hypnotherapy

 

Focus your attention on what you want to achieve

Hypnotherapy

 

What is Hypnotherapy?

Hypnotherapy is used to try to change habits, or to treat specific conditions. It’s a process of guided relaxation, focused attention and intense concentration that leads to a heightened state of awareness. You might know this as ‘a trance’ (which is a naturally occurring state).

While in this trance state, your attention is so focused that anything going on around you is temporarily blocked out or ignored. With the help of a trained therapist you can focus your attention on specific thoughts or tasks.

Why bother?

A hypnotic state can allow you to explore painful thoughts, feelings, or memories that might have been hidden from your conscious mind for years. Hypnosis can also enables you to perceive some things differently, such as blocking an awareness of pain.

Need to know:

There are various types of hypnotherapy, and various ways of hypnotising someone.

  1. You’ll discuss with your hypnotherapist what you hope to achieve and agree which methods your therapist will use.
  2. After this, the hypnotherapist will guide you into a deeply relaxed state.
  3. The hypnotherapist will use the agreed methods to help you towards your goals.
  4. Finally, they will slowly bring you out of the trance.

 

The bottom line:

Hypnosis doesn’t work if you don’t want to be hypnotised. You are fully in control when under hypnosis – you don’t have to take on the therapist’s suggestions if you don’t want to, and If necessary, you can bring yourself out of the hypnotic state.

In the UK, hypnotherapists are not required to hold any specific training by law, so do your homework; always check their credentials, and which organisation they are registered with.

If you have any health conditions (either mental or physical) you MUST always check with a medical professional before you try hypnotherapy.

You must never use hypnotherapy if you have psychosis or certain types of personality disorder, as it could make your condition worse. Always check with your GP.

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